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Posts Tagged ‘Dorothy Pound’

SPRING 1983

CONTENTS

The Periplum

Carol H. Cantrell, “Quotidian to Divine: Some Notes on Canto 81”

Colin McDowell, “‘The Toys … at Auxerre’: Canto 77”

The Explicator

Matthew Little, “Pound and ”ΤΛΗ: Bishop Carame’s Translation of Avicenna as Background”

David Anderson, “Cavalcanti: Canzone to Fortune”

Peter Stoicheff, “CX/778 Revisited”

Carroll F. Terrell, “A Couple of Glosses”

The Biographer

James J. Wilhelm, “Ezra Pound’s New York, 1887-1908: A Recreation”

William French, “For ‘Gentle Graceful Dorothy,’ a Tardy Obit”

The Bibliographer

Donald Gallup and Archie Henderson, “Additions and Corrections to the Revised Edition of the Pound Bibliography”

E. R. Hagemann, “Incoming Correspondence to Dorothy and Ezra Pound at the Lilly Library”

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FALL 1982

CONTENTS

The Periplum

Sanehide Kodama, “Cathay and Fenollosa’s Notebooks”

Timothy Materer, “Doppelgänger: Ezra Pound in His Letters”

Kevin Oderman, “‘Cavalcanti’: That the Body Is Not Evil”

The Explicator

Ben D. Kimpel and T. C. Duncan Eaves, “How the Medici Went Bust”

Reno Odlin, “Dinklage”

Francis J. Bosha, “Pound’s References to Borah and Stalin in Canto 84”

Mohammad Y. Shaheen, “A Note on the Spelling of ‘Habdimlich’ for ‘Abd Al-Malik in The Cantos

The Documentary

Lee Bartlett and Hugh Witemeyer, “Ezra Pound and James Dickey: A Correspondence and a Kinship”

David Gordon, “Corpus Juris and Canto XCIV”

The Vortex

Brendan Jackson, “A Reluctant American: Ezra Pound’s Response to Whitman, Whistler and Henry James”

Margot Speight, “Dorothy Pound at Work”

The Reviewer

Michael King (H.D., HERmione)

Martin A. Kayman (Ian F. A. Bell, Critic as Scientist: The Modernist Poetics of Ezra Pound)

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FALL 1973

CONTENTS

The Periplum

Georg M. Gugelberger, “The Secularization of ‘Love’ to a Poetic Metaphor: Cavalcanti, Center of Pound’s Medievalism”

James J. Wilhelm, “Two Heavens of Light and Love: Paradise to Dante and to Pound”

Leslie H. Palmer, “Matthew Arnold and Ezra Pound’s ABC of Reading

The Explicator

Hugh Kenner, “A Schema for XXX Cantos”

Dalton Gross, “Pound’s Early Literary Reputation: George Sterling’s Dissent”

Timothy Materer, “A Reading of ‘From Canto CXV'”

Walter Michaels, “Lincoln Steffens and Pound”

John Peck, “‘Get a Dictionary’: The Festus behind Pound’s Festus”

The Gallery

Pound and Harry Meacham

Dorothy Pound

Ezra Pound Infant and Family

Le Vorticisme at Eiffel Tower Restaurant, Spring 1915

The Documentary

Carroll F. Terrell, “The Eparch’s Book of Leo the Wise”

Leo the Wise, “To Eparchikon Biblion”

Jules Nicole, “The Eparch’s Book: Greek and Latin Redaction”

The Bibliographer

Donald Gallup, “Supplement to the Bibliography”

The Reviewer

George Lensing (Sister Bernetta Quinn, Ezra Pound, An Introduction to the Poetry)

The cover is a reproduction of the opening lines of the XIVth century manuscript “Genevenses graecus 23” discovered by Jules Nicole in Byzantine Greek. The complete manuscript is reproduced in this issue of Paideuma with the kind permission of Variorum Reprints.

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SPRING 1973

This edition of Paideuma is dedicated to Dorothy Shakespear Pound

CONTENTS

The Periplum

George Antheil, “Why a Poet Quit the Muses”

Charles Shere, “Eastbay Artistis Score Record Triumph”

Robert Hughes, “Ezra Pound’s Opera”

Larry Lyall, “Review of the Hughes Production”

R. Murray Schafer, “The Developing Theories of Absolute Rhythm and Great Bass”

The Explicator

Robert Hughes, “Amarili”

Hugh Kenner, “Some Notes”

Hugh Kenner, “More on the Seven Lakes Canto”

The Biographer

Carroll F. Terrell, “Pound and KRH: An Introduction to Bowers’s Memoir”

Faubion Bowers, “Memoir within Memoirs”

The Documentary

Carroll F. Terrell, “The Sacred Edict of K’ang-Hsi”

The Gallery

Portraits of Dorothy Pound at different years

The Bibliography

Robert Corrigan, “Annotated Checklist”

Robert Corrigan, “Index 1904-1917”

The Reviewer

James Wilhelm (Stuart Y. McDougal, Pound and the Troubadours)

Guy Davenport says of his design for this cover: “Line of Homer (‘Sweet song, the sirens…. etc’) + Orpheus picking his lyra + Theban terra-cotta (actually a sphinx, but here doing duty as a Siren, or Persephone, or simply a Poundian mythological gel + archaic Chinese for ‘man standing beside his word’ / hsien, izzit?”

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